Author Archives: laurieetta

January 29

Being a “lastie”

Remember the Parable of the Vineyard. In this story told by Jesus, the workers who are hired at the end of the day get the same amount of money as those hired in the morning. I love (and hate) this story because it grates on my sense of fairness. When I consider who I identify […]

January 21

Being Jonah

Fearing for their lives, the desperate sailors shouted to their gods for help and threw the cargo overboard to lighten the ship. But all this time Jonah was sound asleep down in the hold. (Jonah 1:5) We don’t often look at the story of Jonah, but what a great one. There is so much to […]

November 28

The Abundant Life

[Jesus said,] “I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.” – John 10:10b Well, it’s here. The push for us to buy, buy, buy is in full swing. Newspapers are bulging with ads and sales designed to make our pocketbook a little bit lighter. The stores want us to buy a great […]

July 14

“Life is difficult”

In the summer of 1978, I spent a couple of months in California with my cousins. We had a blast and made many memories. This past week I had the pleasure of going home to Montana for a family reunion and my cousins from California were there. As you can imagine, there was much reminiscing, […]

May 26

What are you worth?

Say that I am standing in front of a group of people and I pull a $20 bill out my purse and say, “I’ve got a $20 bill here and it’s yours if you want it. Who wants it?” I imagine many people would raise their hands. I tear up the $20 bill and ask, “Who […]

March 11

Words are Not Spaghetti

“Death and life are in the power of the tongue.” Proverbs 18:21 If you’ve ever spent any time in the comment section of a blog or website, you will sadly understand this guy’s description: comment boards on websites are a place where civil discourse goes to die. But that’s not the only place civil conversations […]

January 09

Three Signs of a Miserable Job

In the common American model, the job is central. We are frequently more defined by what we do than by who we are. When meeting a new person, the conversation normally goes as follows: “Hi, I’m so-and-so. What do you do?” From that one brief answer, we make conclusions about that person’s intelligence, education, income, and value […]